10 Frames in Early Childhood

10 Frames are magical tools to build number sense in our young children instead of just rote counting. A strong sense of “10” will enable children to see relationships between numbers. Children need to first develop this strong understanding of the numbers 1-10 before they begin to work with larger numbers.

10 frames

They are two identical rectangles stacked on top of each other divided into five equal segments- thus a “10 frame.”

A 10 Frame is a tool to help children be able to visualize the quantity of numbers, compose and decompose numbers. A 10 Frame supports children’s knowledge of 10 by visually seeing patterns and numbers. For example, if the top row of 5 is filled and the bottom row has three, we want children to be able to automatically think of this quantity in relationship to 10 and state that the quantity is 8 because two are missing.

10 Frames can be incorporated into the curriculum throughout the day- not just to use only as a tool during math time.

EXAMPLES…

Allow children to play with 10 frames during free-choice play time…

10 Frames in Early Childhood
journeyintoearlychildhood.com

journeyintoearlychildhood.com

Allowing children to play with 10 Frames during free-choice play centers

Incorporating 10 Frames into a Behavioral Challenge…

10 Frames Reward system journeyintoearlychildhood

Taking Attendance using a Question of the Day and a 10 Frame…

10 frames question of the day journeyintoearlychildhood

Allowing students to produce the number posters for the classroom…

We are Teachers provides some great hands-on activities to play using a 10 Frame.

CALENDAR TIME: What is DAP?

Moving Away from Calendar Time… WHY?

  • Math practices and instruction need to focus on the children’s understanding of concepts and their ability to explain their thinking.
  • Young children need to be able to use strategies to work with numbers one through five. They need to develop math fluency to five.
  •  Teaching a math skill once is not enough but we know that children need to do- to have their hands on- to learn.

National Education Association for Young Children states that children learn best through hands-on learning experiences and that developmentally appropriate practices include “teachers who “mathematize” children’s everyday experiences.

calendar and scheduleI was blessed to visit a couple of amazing Kindergarten classrooms in Tulsa, OK and was impressed by their calendar routine among many, many other experiences they are providing their students.

They are using a 7 day linear calendar to develop fluency with the number five. Also, so impressive that the Kindergarten classrooms use a visual schedule of their day to teach the concept of time- before and after.

For more information on ways to embed math using developmentally appropriate practices, see past blog https://journeyintoearlychildhood.com/2019/03/06/math-during-free-choice-play/

LINEAR CALENDAR PIECES FOR HOME/SCHOOL and WEATHER DAP Calendar Time journeyintoearlychildhood.com

 

 

 

 

Changing Calendar Time to Be DAP

UPDATED POST with Link to Pieces for a Linear Calendar

Our youngest learners are concrete thinkers; they live in the now. They are not ready for abstract thought. So, let’s ponder the effectiveness of a traditional calendar time that focuses on days of the week, months of the year, patterns, counting, etc. It is not until children are around the ages of 7 to 10 years of age that they are able to judge the relative time from a past event or until a future event will occur. Teaching the skills of time such as yesterday, today and tomorrow, days of the week and months of the year is not developmentally appropriate and can inhibit a child’s confidence in their skills. They may eventually stop participating and/or lose their confidence in their ability to achieve at school.

DAP Calendar Time journeyintoearlychildhood.comThere is little evidence that calendar activities that mark extended periods of time (week, month) are meaningful for children below first grade (Friedman, 2000). National Education Association for Young Children learn best through hands-on learning experiences and that developmentally appropriate practices include “teachers who “mathematize” children’s everyday experiences. For example, they help children learn and practice math skills and concepts during block building, play with games and manipulatives, and movement activities” (Developmentally Appropriate Practice Third Edition). Children will learn patterns, counting, number relationships, etc. best through individual and small group hands-on, meaningful activities, not through the repetitive calendar activities which do not hold any meaning for them. (see https://journeyintoearlychildhood.com/2018/09/05/math-during-free-choice-play/ for pictures of incorporating math into free choice play centers)

If teachers still want to incorporate some type of short calendar routine into their whole group time, here are some more developmentally appropriate ideas:

  • Build concepts of later, before and after by reviewing the daily schedule.pictures of activities
  • Hold calendar time at the end of the day and include a student job of drawing a picture of one exciting event that occurred during the day such as we read The Hungry Caterpillar, we found a caterpillar on the playground, we built a big car, etc.
  • linear 2  Use a linear calendar (7 days). For very young children, the linear calendar should be vertical, just like the daily schedule, and as they grow in their developmental skills, it can be horizontal. Use pictures of home and school- discuss if it is a home day or a school day. Count how many days we have been at school OR chart the weather and discuss how many rainy, sunny, etc. days.   LINEAR CALENDAR PIECES FOR HOME/SCHOOL and WEATHER
  • Start to build the concept of week and month by documenting the work that is Augustaccomplished in the classroom. At the end of each week and/or each month, have the students choose 3-5 pictures from a group of pictures that you have taken over that period of time. They need to reflect on the learning they have done that week and decide as a group which pictures best represent that learning. Jot down children’s comments on notecards. Place the pictures with the comments in a scrapbook or on a large piece of paper to hang in the hallway or classroom. This is a great way to document and showcase children’s learning as well as to demonstrate growth over time.
Resources:
Beneke, Sally J., Ostrosky, Michailene, and Katz, Lilian G. May 2008. Calendar Time for Young Children: Good Intentions Gone Awry. Young Children.
Coople, Carol and Bredekamp, Sue, editors. Developmentally Appropriate Practice in Early Childhood Programs. Third Edition. National Association for the Education of Young Children.
Friedman, W.J. 2000. The development of children’s knowledge of the times of future events. Child Development 71.